AVOCA STREET MEDICAL CENTRE
130 Avoca Street Randwick NSW 2031
Tel: 02 9399 3335 - Fax: 02 9399 9778

avocastreet.com - asmc.net.au - randwickhealth.com - randwickgp.com - familydoctor.sydney


We are open our usual hours.

In the interests of patient and staff safety, only vaccinated patients will be seen in-person at the practice. If you have not yet obtained your vaccination, we can look after you via telehealth. Children under 12 without symptoms will be seen as required.

We will continue to run vaccination clinics under strict settings.

Stay safe, and do call 93993335 if you have further enquiries or would like to make a telehealth appointment.



NB: Unvaccinated patients can consult only by telephone or video conference calls.


eastvax.com jabmenow.com

To book your next
AstraZeneca or Pfizer
COVID-19 vaccination
please visit our
VACCINATION REQUEST & CONSENT PAGE


Dr Priscilla will be on duty on
1st, 3rd and 5th Saturdays of each month.

SURGERY HOURS
MON - FRI7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
SATsee notes
SUN & PUBLIC HOLIDAYSCLOSED

Sorry. We are CLOSED

For services after hours please call 13 74 25


Covid-19 Notices
Emergency Numbers
After Hours 13 74 25
Appointments
Contact
Hours
Doctors
Fees
About
Home
Map
Links
Flu Shot
Immunisation
Facebook
Feedback
Local Pharmacies
Resources

General Information
 

Vaccine Side Effects


A vaccine side effect can be defined as an "adverse reaction" to a vaccine.Most vaccines have some "local" side effects such as pain, redness, swelling, or a small lump at the site of injection. These side effects usually resolve in a few days, although lumps may take weeks or longer to resolve. Occasionally, vaccines may have some "general" side-effects such as fever, headache, muscle aches and pains, or a rash - these side effects may be caused by the vaccine or may be symptoms of a coincidental illness (e.g. viral infection). Again, these side effects usually resolve in a few days (unless they were caused by a coincidental illness). Rarely, in about 1 in every million vaccinations, a vaccine causes asevere allergic reaction called "anaphylaxis", that begin minutes after the vaccination and includes symptoms such as severe anxiety, hives (itchy skin rash), swelling of the lips and face, difficulty breathing, or collapse. The treatment for anaphylaxis is the immediate injection of adrenaline, which stops the allergic reaction.

If a vaccine side effect occurs following one of a series of vaccinations, then, unless the side effect was severe, the series of vaccinations should be completed. If you are concerned about completing a series of vaccinations after a vaccine side effect, then consult your immunisation provider.

To reduce pain from vaccinations:

  • Give paracetamol do not exceed the recommended maximum dosage on the label. Doses of paracetamol should not usually be given less than 4 hours apart.
  • Place a cold, wet cloth over the injection site for pain, redness, or swelling. Note that some infants may not move a limb while the injection site is painful this will resolve as the pain disappears.

To reduce fever from vaccinations:

  • Give extra fluids (e.g. more breast feeds or water) to prevent dehydration.
  • Cool the child slowly by removing extra clothing or fanning. Bathing in cool water is not recommended because it may cause shivering, which can increase the core body temperature.
  • Give paracetamol (see above).

If you are concerned about any symptoms that occur after vaccination, contact your doctor, community nurse, local hospital or HealthDirect on (Free Call) 1800 022 222.

More information
immunise.health.gov.au
ncirs.usyd.edu.au

The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.

©avocastreet.com