AVOCA STREET MEDICAL CENTRE
130 Avoca Street Randwick NSW 2031
Tel: 02 9399 3335 - Fax: 02 9399 9778

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We are open our usual hours.

In the interests of patient and staff safety, only vaccinated patients will be seen in-person at the practice. If you have not yet obtained your vaccination, we can look after you via telehealth. Children under 12 without symptoms will be seen as required.

We will continue to run vaccination clinics under strict settings.

Stay safe, and do call 93993335 if you have further enquiries or would like to make a telehealth appointment.



NB: Unvaccinated patients can consult only by telephone or video conference calls.


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To book your next
AstraZeneca or Pfizer
COVID-19 vaccination
please visit our
VACCINATION REQUEST & CONSENT PAGE


Dr Priscilla will be on duty on
1st, 3rd and 5th Saturdays of each month.

SURGERY HOURS
MON - FRI7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
SATsee notes
SUN & PUBLIC HOLIDAYSCLOSED

Sorry. We are CLOSED

For services after hours please call 13 74 25


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General Information
 

Travel Vaccines and Prophylactic therapy

TwinrixUse: Active immunisation against hepatitis A and hepatitis B virus infection
Adverse Reactions: Local soreness and redness; fatigue; headache; malaise; nausea; others.
1st dose at elected date, 2nd dose 1 month later, 3rd dose 6 months after 1st dose
HavrixUse: Active immunisation against hepatitis A virus infection in susceptible individuals > 15 years
Adverse Reactions: Local soreness, induration, redness, swelling; headache; malaise; fever; nausea, loss of appetite;
Interactions: Hepatitis A virus immune serum globulin
1 mL dose IMI into deltoid +/- booster dose 6-12 months later
Typhim ViUse: Active immunisation against typhoid fever in adults and children greater than or equal to 2 years
Adverse Reactions: Local reactions; fever, headache, malaise, fatigue, joint pain, myalgia, GI upset; others.
Interactions: Other vaccines (admin at separate sites)
0.5 mL IMI, greater than or equal to 2 weeks prior to possible exposure.
VivaximUse: Active immunisation against hepatitis A and Typhoid fever infection
1 ML dose at least 14 days before to possible exposure
A bosster for Hep A in 6 to 12 months later to long term (>10yrs) cover for Hep A
Doryx***Pregnancy Category D
Use: Infections due to susceptible organisms; malaria prophylaxis (in combination with other agents
Contraindications: Concomitant vitamin A, retinoids; pregnancy, lactation, children
Precautions: Renal impairment; venereal disease; prolonged use
Adverse Reactions: Photosensitivity; superinfection; pseudomembranous colitis; GI disturbances; others.
Interactions: Anticoagulants; penicillins; antacids; iron preps; vitamin A, retinoids; barbiturates; anticonvulsants;
100 mg/day; commence 2 days prior to entering a malarious area, continue whilst there and for 2 weeks after leaving malarious area; max. 8 weeks therapy;
[Should be taken with food.]
Mencevax ACWYUse: Active immunisation against meningococcal meningitis (groups A, C, W135, Y) in adults, children > 2 years
Precautions: Impaired immune response; acute malaria; pregnancy, lactation
Adverse Reactions: Local reactions; lymphadenopathy; fever; URT illness; fatigue; malaise; headache; increased
meningococcal carriage rates; neurological reactions
0.5 mL SCI.
Stamaril Pregnancy Category B2
Use: Immunisation against yellow fever
Contraindications: Hypersensitivity to poultry products; acute febrile, chronic disease; immunodeficiency;
generalised malignancies; IV admin; infants < 6 months
Precautions: Pregnancy; children 6-12 months
Adverse Reactions: Local induration, redness, haematoma; asthenia; fever; headache; myalgia
Adults, children > 6 months: 0.5 mL (reconstituted vaccine) SCI or IMI provides protection for life.


The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.

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