AVOCA STREET MEDICAL CENTRE
130 Avoca Street Randwick NSW 2031
Tel: 02 9399 3335 - Fax: 02 9399 9778

avocastreet.com - asmc.net.au - randwickhealth.com - randwickgp.com - familydoctor.sydney
Doctors' Roster
AngelaPriscillaKienMandy
Mon8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00  10:00 - 16:00
Tue8:00 - 12:00 14:00 - 18:00 07:30 - 14:00  
Wed8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  
Thu8:00 - 12:00  07:30 - 14:00 10:00 - 16:00
Fri8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  

SURGERY HOURS
MON - FRI7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
SATsee notes
SUN & PUBLIC HOLIDAYSCLOSED

Sorry. We are CLOSED

For services after hours please call 13 74 25



We are open our usual hours.

In the interests of patient and staff safety, only vaccinated patients will be seen in-person at the practice. If you have not yet obtained your vaccination, we can look after you via telehealth. Children under 12 without symptoms will be seen as required.

We will continue to run vaccination clinics under strict settings.

Stay safe, and do call 93993335 if you have further enquiries or would like to make a telehealth appointment.



NB: Unvaccinated patients can consult only by telephone or video conference calls.


eastvax.com jabmenow.com

To book your next
AstraZeneca or Pfizer
COVID-19 vaccination
please visit our
VACCINATION REQUEST & CONSENT PAGE


Dr Priscilla will be on duty on
1st, 3rd and 5th Saturdays of each month.

General Information
 

Zostavax - Shingles Vaccine


The shingles vaccine, Zostavax®, has been approved to be placed on the National Immunisation Program (NIP), to be provided free of charge from 1 November 2016 to people aged 70 years, subject to vaccine supply. There will also be a five year catch-up program for people aged 71 – 79 years.

What is Shingles?
Shingles is a painful rash caused by the varicella-zoster virus which is the same virus that causes chickenpox.

The shingles rash develops into itchy blisters usually occurring on one side of the body either on the face, chest, back, abdomen or pelvis, and can take several weeks to settle.

Around 1 in 100 Australians who are older than 50, are thought to have had shingles at some stage.

Shingles diagnosis
If you have had chickenpox in the past, the virus stays in the nerve cells near the spine, but is not active. Shingles occurs when the virus becomes active again.

You cannot catch shingles from someone who has shingles. But, if you have not had chickenpox you can catch chickenpox by being in direct contact with fluid on the blisters of someone who has shingles.

Almost all people have had chickenpox by the time they turn 40 and may be at risk of developing shingles. Sometimes shingles can occur with no known trigger. However, shingles is more likely to occur if you:

  • are older than 50, particularly those who are older than 80
  • have HIV and AIDS
  • have had an organ transplant
  • have recently had a bone-marrow transplant
  • have a condition which requires treatment that impacts the immune system, such as chemotherapy for cancer
  • are experiencing physical and emotional stress.


Over-the counter medications such as paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, can be used for pain relief. If over-the-counter medicines aren’t controlling your pain, your doctor may prescribe other medicines such as opioids, anti-depressants and anticonvulsants .

Click here for further information from immunise.health.gov.au

The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.

Covid-19 Notices
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After Hours 13 74 25
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General Information
 

Taking PBS medicines overseas

Travellers taking PBS medicines overseas should make sure the medicine is legal in the country they are travelling to by contacting the relevant embassy, high commission or consulate before leaving Australia.

If you are planning to take PBS medicines overseas for your own personal use or the use of someone travelling with you, you should:

  • contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country you are visiting to make sure the medicine is legal there
  • carry a letter from your doctor detailing what the medicine is, how much you will be taking and stating that the medicine is for your personal use
  • leave the medicine in its original packaging
  • There are restrictions on the amount of PBS medicines you can take overseas. Check with your doctor before you travel.

Customs may detain any medicine suspected of being illegally exported. It is in your best interests to have a letter from your doctor explaining what the medicine is, how much you are carrying and that it is for your personal use. If you are unable to get a letter from your doctor, the Medicine Export Declaration form may be enough to let Customs know the medicine is for your personal use. People found to be illegally exporting PBS medicines overseas may be prosecuted.

More from www.humanservices.gov.au

The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.

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