AVOCA STREET MEDICAL CENTRE
130 Avoca Street Randwick NSW 2031
Tel: 02 9399 3335 - Fax: 02 9399 9778

avocastreet.com - asmc.net.au - randwickhealth.com - randwickgp.com - familydoctor.sydney

General Practitioners

Dr. Angela Georgopoulos

M.B.B.S FRACGP
University of NSW
Interests: Womens health, Family Medicine

Rostered hours
Mon8:00 - 12:00
Tue8:00 - 12:00
Wed8:00 - 12:00
Thu8:00 - 12:00
Fri8:00 - 12:00

* See Saturday consult conditions


Dr. Kien
Cao-Xuan

Dr. Mandy
Chuang

Dr. Priscilla
Wong

Request An Appointment Online

Doctors' Roster
AngelaPriscillaKienMandy
Mon8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00  10:00 - 16:00
Tue8:00 - 12:00 14:00 - 18:00 07:30 - 14:00  
Wed8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  
Thu8:00 - 12:00  07:30 - 14:00 10:00 - 16:00
Fri8:00 - 12:00 08:30 - 17:00 07:30 - 14:00  

NOTICE DURING CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC
In order to improve the safety of the community, of our patients and of our staff during the Coronavirus pandemic, Avoca Street Medical Centre will need to implement some temporary changes to our general practice services. Telephone consults are available and preferred.

However, patients will be able to book a face to face consultation (provided they have no symptoms of cough, fever, sore throat or runny nose OR have had a NEGATIVE COVID TEST in the previous 5 days). Face to face consultations will be kept strictly within 10 minutes to stay under the duration outlined by the NSW Health definition of "close contacts".

ALL PATIENTS ARE REQUIRED TO WEAR FACE MASKS WHILE IN OUR OFFICE

Please call us on (02) 9399 3335 for an appointment.
Patients with any symptoms are encouraged to directly attend the COVID Clinics for testing. Both open 7 days per week:

  1. Prince of Wales Hospital (Building 14B, Ground Floor, Avoca Street, Randwick)
  2. Sydney Children's Hospital - under 16 year olds (Hospital Road, High St End)

Patients who have tested negative but with ongoing symptoms will be able to attend our practice for assessment after advising staff.

Meanwhile, please heed current public health pandemic advice: stay inside your home, wash hands, observe physical distancing, regular exercise and maintain mental wellness.

  • PRACTICE UPDATES

  • TELE-HEALTH
  • HOW TO SELF ISOLATE

  • NSW.GOV.AU/COVID-19
  • COVID VACCINES

  • COVID CLINICS
  • Covid-19 Notices
    Emergency Numbers
    After Hours 13 74 25
    Appointments
    Contact
    Hours
    Doctors
    Fees
    About
    Home
    Map
    Links
    Flu Shot
    Immunisation
    Facebook
    Feedback
    Local Pharmacies
    Resources

    General Information
     

    Asthma & Weather



    It seems reasonable to think that rain would relieve allergic rhinitis (hay fever) and asthma triggered by pollen by washing pollen out of the air. This is incorrect as heavy rain often makes some people get worse. Epidemics of thunderstorm asthma have been described in Melbourne, Wagga and London. Here's why.

    Around 1 in 4 people with hay fever also have asthma.

    Some people with severe allergic rhinitis (hay fever) think that their allergic rhinitis turns into asthma or will make them tight in the chest or wheeze. This is incorrect as pollen can trigger asthma as well as allergic rhinitis symptoms.

    Grass pollen can be wind-blown for long distances.

    Pasture grasses rely on the wind to distribute their pollen. A single hectare of ryegrass, for example, will release hundreds of kilograms of pollen per season. The concentration of pollen will be highest nearest its source, but high-speed winds will distribute pollen grains over long distances.

    Not all allergen, however, is contained within intact pollen grains. Other allergen-carrying particles (as small as 0.1 um diameter) can carry grass and tree allergens. Unlike most intact pollen grains (generally 2-60 um diameter), these smaller particles are capable of reaching the small airways of the lung and triggering asthma attacks.

    These particles may come from fragments of pollen grains, from plant sap (such as that released from grass blades when mowing the lawn) or the decay of plant material. Some of them might even be derived from the sticking of allergen to particles of atmospheric pollution.

    Thunderstorms and weather changes can trigger asthma attacks

    It seems reasonable to think that rain could help relieve symptoms of allergic rhinitis (hayfever) and asthma by "washing" pollen out of the air. Paradoxically, some people actually feel worse. So-called thunderstorm asthma has been described in epidemics in Melbourne, Wagga and London. An explanation has been found in recent studies on how allergen can be released into the atmosphere.

    Some grass allergen (like ryegrass allergen Lol pIX) is located on the surface of starch granules within pollen grains. A single pollen grain contains up to 700 starch granules of 0.6 to 2.5 um (small enough to reach the lower airways in the lung). When it rains or is humid, pollen grains can absorb moisture and burst, releasing hundreds of small allergenic particles that can penetrate deep into the small airways of the lung.

    Not everyone who gets thunderstorm asthma has had it before. They have normally had severe pollen allergic rhinitis (hay fever) and most have been found to be allergic to ryegrass. Presumably the massive load of small allergenic particles being inhaled straight into the lung trigger these attacks.

    Pollen asthma can be treated effectively

    Appropriate management of chronic pollen asthma (which probably has a similar mechanism to thunderstorm asthma) includes commencing anti-inflammatory (preventer) asthma medication. This can be given preventatively or with the first wheeze in Spring. Some patients undergoing immunotherapy (desensitisation) for their allergic rhinitis (hay fever) find that their seasonal asthma improves as well. So if you wheeze during Spring, see your doctor for appropriate advice.

    Further information
    ASCIA
    ASTHMA FOUNDATIONS OF AUSTRALIA
    NATIONAL ASTHMA COUNCIL

    The information in the above were collected from the internet,
    either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
    They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.

    ©avocastreet.com