AVOCA STREET MEDICAL CENTRE
130 Avoca Street Randwick NSW 2031
Tel: 02 9399 3335 - Fax: 02 9399 9778

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Message from your GPs


Angela


Kien


We are open our usual hours.

In the interests of patient and staff safety, only vaccinated patients will be seen in-person at the practice. If you have not yet obtained your vaccination, we can look after you via telehealth.

If you have any symptoms including sore throat, fever, cough or runny nose, please call and book a telehealth consult.

Children under 12 will be seen as required (accompanying parents must be fully vaccinated).

We will continue to run vaccination clinics under strict settings.

Stay safe, and do call 93993335 if you have further enquiries.

Mandy


Priscilla

Our reception is low on staff. Please be patient.
Thank you for your understanding.
SURGERY HOURS
MON - FRI7:30 AM - 5:30 PM
SATsee notes
SUN & PUBLIC HOLIDAYSCLOSED
Tuesday 18 January 2022
Dr Kien1 PM - 5 PM
Dr Angela8 AM - 12 PM
Dr Mandy10 AM - 1 PM
Dr Priscilla2 PM - 6 PM

We are OPEN

Please call 02 9399 3335 to speak to our reception.


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To book your next Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination

please visit our

VACCINATION REQUEST & CONSENT PAGE



Dr Priscilla will be on duty on
1st and 3rd Saturdays of each month.
Dr Priscilla is away on holiday until 10 Jan 2022.



NB: Unvaccinated patients can consult only by telephone or video conference calls.

01/01/2022

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General Information
 

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea


Sleep apnoea occurs when the walls of the throat come together during sleep, blocking off the upper airway. Breathing stops for a period of time (generally between ten seconds and up to one minute) until the brain registers the lack of breathing or a drop in oxygen levels and sends a small wake-up call. The sleeper rouses slightly, opens the upper airway, typically snorts and gasps, then drifts back to sleep almost immediately.

In most cases, the person suffering from sleep apnoea doesn’t even realise they are waking up. This pattern can repeat itself hundreds of times every night, causing fragmented sleep. This leaves the person feeling unrefreshed in the morning, with excessive daytime sleepiness, poor daytime concentration and work performance, and fatigue. It’s estimated that about five per cent of Australians suffer from this sleep disorder, with around one in four men over the age of 30 years affected.

Degrees of severity of sleep apnoea

The full name for this condition is obstructive sleep apnoea. Another rare form of breathing disturbance during sleep is called central sleep apnoea. It is caused by a disruption to the mechanisms that control the rate and depth of breathing. The severity of sleep apnoea depends on how often the breathing is interrupted. As a guide:
  • normal sleep – fewer than five interruptions per hour
  • mild sleep apnoea – between 5 and 15 interruptions per hour
  • moderate sleep apnoea – between 15 and 30 interruptions per hour
  • severe sleep apnoea – more than 30 interruptions per hour.


Symptoms of sleep apnoea

People with significant sleep apnoea have an increased risk of motor vehicle accidents and high blood pressure, and may have an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

In the over-30 age group, the disorder is about three times more common in men than women. Some of the associated symptoms include:
  • daytime sleepiness, fatigue and tiredness
  • poor concentration
  • irritability and mood changes
  • impotence and reduced sex drive
  • need to get up to toilet frequently at night.


Causes of sleep apnoea

Obesity is one of the most common causes of sleep apnoea. Other contributing factors include:
  • alcohol, especially in the evening – this relaxes the throat muscles and hampers the brain’s reaction to sleep disordered breathing
  • certain illnesses, such as reduced thyroid production or the presence of a very large goitre
  • large tonsils, especially in children
  • medications, such as sleeping tablets and sedatives
  • nasal congestion and obstruction
  • facial bone shape and the size of muscles, such as an undershot jaw.


Source: www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au

The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.

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