AVOCA STREET MEDICAL CENTRE
 
130 Avoca Street Randwick NSW 2031
Tel: 02 9399 3335 - Fax: 02 9399 9778

avocastreet.com - asmc.net.au - randwickhealth.com - randwickgp.com - familydoctor.sydney

Psychologist

Helena Swiatek
B.A. (Psyc Hons), M. Clinical Psychology,
Post Grad Cert (Psychological Coaching),
M Bus (Employment Relations)

Helena is an enthusiastic and committed Clinical Psychologist who uses a strengths based approach with her child, adolescent, and adult clients. Helena has extensive experience in helping people with a range of psychological issues, including anxiety disorders (e.g. panic, generalised anxiety, social anxiety, and OCD), mood disorders (including depression and bipolar disorder), relationship difficulties, sleep difficulties, grief and loss, substance abuse, tics and Tourette Syndrome.

Starting with a positive psychology approach, and building on the individual strengths that each client brings, Helena offers evidence-based therapeutic interventions, including cognitive behavioural therapy, schema therapy, mindfulness, solution focus, and motivational interviewing.

Helena has also facilitated groups for anxious children and their parents, and also for adults dealing with OCD, and ADHD.

Helena has a warm and engaging style, and works collaboratively with her clients.

Helena is Medicare and WorkCover accredited, a Member of the Australian Psychology Society, and a Fellow of the APS College of Clinical Psychologists.


Helena will consult at Avoca Street Medical Centre on Tuesdays.
Contact: (M) 0425 252 802 (W) www.helenaswiatek.com

TELEHEALTH

During this evolving COVID-19 period, Avoca Street Medical Centre advises all patients to self-isolate as much as possible. In particular we wish to protect the community's most vulnerable patients. We now offer bulk billed telephone consultations for all Medicare eligible patients whom have been seen at this practice in the past 4 years.

For patients who do not hold a valid Medicare card but have been seen at our practice in the past 4 years a pre-paid administration fee of $40 per 10 minute consultation will apply.

Avoca Street Medical Centre is currently unable to accept new patients.
We apologise for any inconvenience.

Please make a telephone appointment by:

  1. Calling 02 93993335
  2. Requesting a telephone appointment on a specific day with your preferred doctor
  3. Please leave the telephone number where you can be reached
Please allow a leeway of 2 hours from the time of your appointment. If matter is urgent or might require a face to face consult, please let staff know and doctor will call you back in between patients on the same day.

NOTE:

  • Please organise your own collection of prescriptions and referrals from reception desk between 8am - 1pm daily
  • Appointments are timed to 10 minutes - if a longer appointment is required, the doctor will rebook this for another date
  • Some items cannot be completed via telehealth and require a face to face consult. These include vaccinations, ear checks, blood pressure checks, and where specific examination of the patient is required. The doctor may rebook a face to face consult after an initial telephone consultation
  • Please respect that this is a limited service which many patients require, and be readily contactable on the day of your appointment.
  • Due to the nature of telephone consultations, we are unable to undertake chronic care for patients who do not regularly attend our practice. Please contact your usual provider.
  • Please check our COVID-19 PRACTICE UPDATES frequently.

General Information
 

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (sometimes referred to as GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born. It is diagnosed when higher than normal blood glucose levels first appear during pregnancy.

Gestational diabetes is becoming more common in Australia, affecting thousands of pregnant women. Between 5% and 10% of pregnant women will develop gestational diabetes and this usually occurs around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. All women are tested for gestational diabetes as part of the 24-28 week routine examination with their GP. Women who have one or more of the risk factors are advised to have a diabetes test when pregnancy is confirmed then again at 24 weeks if diabetes was not detected in early pregnancy.

While there is no one reason for why women develop gestational diabetes, you are at risk of developing gestational diabetes if you:

  • Are over 25 years of age
  • Have a family history of type 2 diabetes
  • Are overweight
  • Are from an Indigenous Australian or Torres Strait Islander background
  • Are from a Vietnamese, Chinese, middle eastern, Polynesian or Melanesian background
  • Have had gestational diabetes during previous pregnancies
  • Have previously had Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
  • Have previously given birth to a large baby
  • Have a family history of gestational diabetes
Most women are diagnosed after special blood tests. A Glucose Challenge Test (GCT) is a screening test where blood is taken for a glucose measurement one hour after a glucose drink. If this test is abnormal then an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) is done. For an OGTT a blood sample is taken before and two hours after the drink.

What to do after being diagnosed?

For many people, being diagnosed with gestational diabetes can be upsetting. However, it is important to remember that the majority of women with gestational diabetes have a healthy pregnancy, normal delivery and a healthy baby. The treatment is healthy eating, physical activity and monitoring and maintaining a normal blood glucose level while you are pregnant. Read more about managing gestational diabetes.

Risks of developing type 2 diabetes

While maternal blood glucose levels usually return to normal after birth, there is an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. The baby may also be at risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

What causes gestational diabetes?

In pregnancy, the placenta produces hormones that help the baby grow and develop. These hormones also block the action of the motherís insulin. This is called insulin resistance. Because of this insulin resistance, the need for insulin in pregnancy is 2 to 3 times higher than normal. If you already have insulin resistance, then your body may not be able to cope with the extra demand for insulin production and the blood glucose (sugar) levels will be higher resulting in gestational diabetes being diagnosed.

When the pregnancy is over and blood glucose levels return to normal the diabetes disappears, however this insulin resistance increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in later life.

Management, care and treatment

Gestational diabetes can often initially be managed with healthy eating and regular physical activity. However, for some women with gestational diabetes, insulin injections will be necessary for the rest of the pregnancy. Read more about managing gestational diabetes.

More from www.diabetesaustralia.com.au

The information in the above were collected from the internet,
either from government websites or from reasonably reliable health information sources.
They are for general information only and should not replace the need of seeking medical care during illnesses.


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